Rogan Josh


Rogan Josh is an aromatic and rich Kashmiri dish with a Persian origin.  The dish has a tomato base and best served with naan to scoop up the gravy.  Here’s my recipe for cooking it at home.  This recipe is for 2 people.

Ingredients:

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500 grams of meat, cubed – traditionally you would use lamb for the dish, but I’ve used beef as it’s all I had on hand at the time.  Mutton, hogget and even venison can be used.
4 green cardamom pods
2cm stick of cinnamon
1 tsp turmeric
2 tsp garam masala
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp smoked paprika
3 cloves of garlic, minced
2 cm knob of ginger, minced
2 large tomatoes, cut into thin segments
1 medium onion, minced
1 cup of tomato passata (unflavoured, crushed tomatoes – using 2/3 cup of tomato puree or 4 tbsp of tomato paste mixed into 1 cup of water can also work, if you can’t get your hands on passata)
2 tbsp of plain yoghurt
4 tbsp of vegetable oil for cooking

Method:

Start by covering your meat with the yoghurt – this breaks down the meat and makes it more tender.  Leave for at least a couple of hours, but overnight is best.  To get a richer flavour, you can add some ground cumin  to the yoghurt and meat.

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Start frying your onions and whole spices in the oil over a medium heat – allow the onions to go translucent.  I’m cooking everything in my pressure cooker, but it can equally be done on the stovetop.

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Add the ground spices and tomatoes and mix into a spice mix.  Cook for about 4 minutes to get all the spices infused in to the onions.

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Add in your passata/puree/water & tomato paste – add in a little extra water if the mixture feels dry – it should be a decent gravy, but not too thin.

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Time to throw in your meat and yoghurt.  You can also add in some bayleaves at this point, if you want an earthier flavour.

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Pressure cook at a medium/high temperature for 10 mins or leave to cook on the stovetop on a medium heat for 40 mins.  If you’re cooking on the stovetop, then make sure the mix doesn’t dry out and keep topping up with a little water.

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Pressure cooking leaves the meat beautifully tender, very quickly but one of the negatives of pressure cooking is that it can leave the sauce a little thin.  Keep cooking, uncovered, to thicken the sauce – the lower the heat and longer the cooking time, the richer the sauce will become.  A Rogan Josh cooked slowly overnight is AMAZING, but it’s rare that people have time for this.

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Serve with basmati and naan.  Enjoy!

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9 responses to “Rogan Josh

    • Dang, sounds good. Might have to head to Itaewon next wkeneed to find a shop with those spices and cook myself a fine curry. Incidentally I had a rather good Lamb Boti Masala in Myeongdong last night with Kingfisher the best indian beer for curry.

  1. How abou putting iit in a slow cooker/crockpot after you’re done with the pressure cooking?

  2. I do love the manner in which you have psenerted this specific concern and it does give me some fodder for consideration. Nonetheless, from just what I have observed, I just wish as the actual comments pile on that men and women continue to be on issue and in no way embark upon a soap box associated with the news du jour. All the same, thank you for this fantastic piece and even though I do not necessarily agree with it in totality, I regard your point of view.

  3. In terms of cooking, I always shy away from Indian food even though it’s my all time favorite. I could never get the ratio of spice right in any dish. But I followed your recipe of Rogan Josh last night and boy oh boy was it great! Finally my apartment smells like the Indian restaurant I frequent. Thank you so much for posting this! Please keep up with the good work. I shall cook more Indian food from now on!

  4. I made this recipe yesterday and it was fabulous. The flavour and aroma is everything I expect in a Rogan Josh. Not only was it great but it was really easy to prepare with very little “hands on” time.

    I used 550 g of goat shoulder (some call goat “mutton”) chopped into small pieces, leaving all the bone in. I marinated the goat in the yoghurt overnight for around 14 hours. In hindsight I should have used more goat because the bones aren’t edible (obviously), so I was a little short on meat in the end.

    I started in a frying pan then moved everything to a slow cooker where it cooked at around 80 C for about 6 hours. Most of the meat was very tender, but some parts were a little chewy so I will cook for another couple of hours next time I use the same cut of goat.

    10/10, I’ll make this again.

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